#YQrtw Argentina week 1: June 6 to 12

Buenos Aires round the world trip
#YQrtw 0606 #BuenosAires, #Argentina

After a long 17-hour journey, I finally reached South America for the second half of the trip. I spent two months in the continent, spending half of the time taking Spanish classes and the other half just walking around.

Buenos Aires is a beautiful city because of the traditional European buildings. Not that non-European buildings aren’t pretty but the aesthetic is better.

One problem with a long trip around the world is the season. I absolutely detest the cold but it was winter in the southern hemisphere when I was travelling. My stockings didn’t help with the cold at all in the morning. At night, I wore thermal and switched on the heater in the hostel. Brr..

Read the original entry: Speechless in Buenos Aires [Day 60 Jun 6]

Buenos Aires round the world trip
#YQrtw 0607 Buenos Aires, Argentina

I signed up for Spanish class on this day at Elebaires which is a language school just opposite my hostel. (It’s amazing that it takes me five minutes to reach my class.) The language schools in South America that I went to have weekly syllables for people visiting.

I was a barbarian when I first arrived in Buenos Aires. I didn’t speak Spanish and couldn’t communicate. I ended up taking two weeks of classes at Elebaires.

The school has daily after-school activities. I was told that I could join the cycling trip that evening. I gladly joined.

And as luck would have it, the chain on my bicycle became loose halfway cycling. I seem to have this problem when I travel: in San Francisco and in Hoi An, and a deflated tyre in Fukuoka.

Read the original entry: Thrift shopping in Buenos Aires [YQrtw Day 61 Jun 7]

Buenos Aires round the world trip
0608.2013 Buenos Aires, Argentina

Can you guess where this photo was taken? It’s actually a cemetery–the famous La Recoleta cemetery in Buenos Aires.

It is so beautiful that I visited this place three times during my two weeks in the Argentinian capital. The statues, marble mausoleums and tourists made the place less scary than most cemeteries.

I spent a lot of time here just reading on one of the benches, chilly but warmed by the winter sun. I remember trying to get hold of just that bit of someone’s unlocked Wi-Fi at one of the walls nearest to a residential area.

What is it like to be dead and housed in a beautiful tomb? Nothing, I suppose. The tombs aren’t for the dead but for the living’s eyes.

Buenos Aires round the world trip
YQrtw 0609 Buenos Aires, Argentina

I figured I didn’t have many weekends in BA so I set off to see the San Telmo market. It was drizzling, not a good start to a day outdoors.

I chose to walk the 2km journey from the hostel to the market. Yay Google Maps.

Buenos Aires round the world trip
0610.2013 Buenos Aires, Argentina

The language school took us out to La Boca to check out the football stadium La Bombonera and this coloruful street.

There were cafes which hired tango dancers to entertain tourists–and get them to their cafes. There were little artist shops selling things I wouldn’t buy in a million years.

Buenos Aires round the world trip
0611.2013 Buenos Aires, Argentina

Through my hostel, I signed up for a touristic experience of tango mini lesson + dinner + watching dance.

There was a storyline in the dance I watched, featuring gangsters and femme fatales.

To this day, I still can’t dance to save anyone’s life.

Buenos Aires round the world trip
0612 Buenos Aires, Argentina

I was taking Spanish classes in BA. There’s a short break in between class and out-of-school activities for us to grab something to eat.

I found a Chinese eatery and ventured in. The place serves buffet-style food with precooked food laid out in sad warm metal dishes. You take as much food as you want and the price is calculated based on weight.

Woah! I never had my food weighed so I was careful to place what I thought were lighter food (loads of carbs). Tastewise, it wasn’t terrible so it was good enough for me.

Later in Peru, I would discover “chifa” which is Peruvian Chinese food.

The Wikipedia page’s history of chifa is funny: “Around 1920, the first Chinese Peruvian restaurants were opened in Lima and were given the name Chifa. The Limean aristocracy was amazed by the bittersweet sauce, chaufa rice, the soup, and other dishes of the ancient cuisine. From that moment on, wealthy Limeans became fascinated by Chifa, to an extent that in some regions of the country there are more chifas than creole (which here is used to refer to the natives) restaurants.”

More about Liau Yun Qing

Yun Qing is a writer, improviser and curious person. She loves finding little adventures in life. In 2013, she went on a 130-day round-the-world trip. She wrote a book to help those who also want to go on a career break.

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